Fact Sheet2022-05-05T00:55:27+07:00
805, 2022

Illegal Logging and Deforestation Analysis

Changes in the use of forest areas on a large scale for production needs are currently one of the factors that influence the occurrence of deforestation, moreover, the use of the area is carried out illegally, and or permits to use the area are obtained from a corruption process so that the illegal permits become as if the permit is illegal. - if legal. The corruption case in licensing the use of forest areas as production areas is not new, in 2013 the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) arrested the Governor of Riau Rusli Zainal on charges of granting a work [...]

1910, 2020

Assessing Compliance in The Implementation of The Timber Legality Assurance System (SVLK) In 8 Provinces

From October 2019 to June 2020, Independent Forest Monitoring Network (JPIK) assessed the implementation of the Timber Legality Assurance System (SVLK) through a series of analysis of the primary industry raw material supply chain and field monitoring in eight provinces. The results of the analysis and monitoring are written in a collection of fact sheets, as follows:: Aceh: Findings from SVLK Implementation Monitoring for Non-producing Exporter, CV Bidika Perkasa Aceh: Monitoring the Performance of Industrial Forest PT Rencong Pulp and Paper Industry Banten: SVLK Implementation in the Primary Industry PD Sinar Agung Bengkulu: Indications of Illegal Logging Under Cover of [...]

1212, 2018

SVLK Violations and Denial of Natural Forest and Peatland Protection Policies

A. Background Illegal logging in Indonesia reached its peak after the fall of President Soeharto and the reform era began. The economic crisis and legal uncertainty after the transition of power are well utilized by a number of people who have the influence to exploit forest resources, especially tropical timber which has high commercial value. During the peak period of illegal logging, the highest rate of natural forest loss occurred in Indonesia, which was around 2 million ha (FWI / GFW, 2001) and based on a study conducted by CIFOR in 2004, an estimated 80% of Indonesian timber came from [...]

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